Whole Wheat Baguette

February 28, 2013 § 2 Comments

If we run out of crackers, I make Crackers. If we run out of hummus, I make Jennifer make Red Pepper Hummus. And if we run out of bread, I make bread. It’s just what we do. We make things. Bread included.

Bread is work. There’s the mixing and the kneading and the proofing and the punching and the second proofing and the loaf shaping. It’s up-to-your-elbows-in-dough kinda work—the type of work that gives you strong-as-oxen forearms.

Until a rather vigorous episode of dough kneading a few years ago set off some rather painful carpal tunnel symptoms, I kneaded all dough by hand. Then by necessity I had my Kitchen-Aid mixer and its dough attachment take over. And now, thanks to Mark Bittman, I’m letting the food processor do all that work.

It’s odd—almost sacrilegious—to think that a machine with a sharp spinning blade can make a soft and smooth clump of dough rather than a bowlful of shredded sticky flour. But it does. And while I was once skeptical and hesitant to come under the no-knead tent, I have entered, heard the word, and am now a food-pro convert. Halleluiah.

Mark Bittman, the New York Times‘ food guy, included the following recipe in the Feb. 3 NYT Sunday Magazine. It’s actually what he calls “not quite whole grain,” and I agree, but there is enough wheat flour in there to give it that nice flavor and chew. What I really like about this is the hands-off nature of the recipe. The first step takes no more than 3 minutes, then you’re free for the next 3 hours while the dough rises. The most work comes during the baguette shaping process. And quite honestly, if you want to learn how to shape a baguette, search for it on YouTube.

In all, you’ll have lovely baguettes in a little over 4 hours—and with very little effort. Throw some flour in your hair to make it look like hard work.

dry ingredients in bowl of food processor

dry ingredients in bowl of food processor

dough comes together in food processor after about a minute

dough comes together in food processor after about a minute

dough turned out into lightly oiled bowl, ready to rise

dough turned out into lightly oiled bowl, ready to rise

dough rises about this much after 3 hours

dough rises about this much after 3 hours

after turning the risen dough out onto a lightly floured surface, cut into three segments and roll into a tight ball

after turning the risen dough out onto a lightly floured surface, cut into three segments and roll into a tight ball

form the dough ball into the best rectangle you can get

form the dough ball into the best rectangle you can get

fold the bottom side up toward the center

fold the bottom side up toward the center

then fold the top down to create something that looks like an envelope

then fold the top down to create something that looks like an envelope

fold length of dough down about a third and press the seam to seal - and repeat.

fold length of dough down about a third and press the seam to seal – and repeat.

set formed loaves into stiff canvas to help them keep their shape while the rise another 30 minutes.

set formed loaves into stiff canvas to help them keep their shape while they rise another 30 minutes.

fresh out of the oven! okay, so they are odd shaped. embrace the odd.

fresh out of the oven! okay, so they are odd shaped. embrace the odd.

Whole Wheat Baguette (from Mark Bittman, New York Times Sunday Magazine, Feb. 10, ’13)
100 g. whole wheat flour
400 g. all-purpose flour + some
10 g. kosher salt
6 g. instant yeast
water

1. Combine dry ingredients in a food processor. Turn machine on and while it’s whirring, add about 1.5 cups of water slowly over a 30-sec. period. Keep machine running for another 45 sec. or so. Dough will be held together nicely and tacky, not wet. Turn dough into a large bowl (I lightly oil mine just in case), cover with plastic wrap, and let it rise. It should take 2-3 hours. I let it go for the whole 3 hours and it’s risen quite nicely.

2. Turn the dough out onto a minimally floured surface, pat lightly, and cut into 3 equal pieces. Recipe says to form into a log, but I form into small round boules. Cover with a tea towel (or plastic wrap) and let it sit for 20 minutes.

3. Now shape each dough round into a baguette. I am SO not the expert at this but … This is how I do it:
-pat dough into a rectangle, kinda the size of a small 8.5×5 notebook. The following will work best if the corners are as square as possible (yes, getting dough to be exactly square is impossible but give it your best try).
-Position the long side down. Fold the bottom end up about a 1/3 of the way, and then fold the top end down over it so it looks like an envelope. Take the heel of your hand or your thumb and press and seal that seam together. Lightly flatten the dough.
-Next, fold the top down about a 1/3 of the way and seal the seam again. Lightly flatten. Repeat this process another two to three times.
-Starting from the center of the dough, place your hands over the top of the dough and slowly and lightly roll the dough up and down, pressing outward to lengthen it. Don’t go all that far. The longer it is, the thinner it is. And … that’s it.

4. Once the baguette is formed, put the baguettes into something like a baguette pan. Or, use a lightly floured swatch of canvas (or a heavy tea towel) and shape the canvas around the long sides of each baguette. You want the canvas to cradle the dough and help keep the dough’s shape. Let the dough rise for about 30 minutes.

5. Meanwhile, get your oven heated to at least 450F (Bittman’s recipe says 465F, but my oven only goes to 450F). A few minutes before the dough is ready to go in the oven, open the oven door and spray some water around the side walls and close it back up. Just before putting the loaves in, put them on a piece of parchment on a sheet pan and slash the tops with quick movements of a very sharp knife. Slide it in the oven, give the loaves a quick squirt with was water and close the door. Repeat the squirting with water about a minute later. Keep them in the oven for about 25-30 minutes, or until the loaf sounds hollow when you thump the bottom of it with your thumb. Cool on a wire rack.

Now, why are we spraying with water? To create a bit of moisture in the oven and around the loaves. This moisture helps to create that light and crisp exterior on the loaf. It works, so give it a go.

You likely have your own favorite bread recipe. Let me know what it is in the comments below.

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§ 2 Responses to Whole Wheat Baguette

  • jenni says:

    thanks for this post!! i’m making this bread right now and, though i make a lot of bread, i wasn’t sure what bittman meant by “risen”. (seriously, bittman, could you be any more vague?) so thank you for your pic!! since you asked, my favorite/signature bread recipe is something that i refer to as “polish french bread”….it was originally beth hensberger’s “french bread” recipe but i modified it, and i’m polish. :-) i replace some of the white flour with whole-wheat flour and semolina. AND i add a little bit of olive oil, for its preservative quality.

    • Thanks for the comments, Jenni! Polish-French bread, huh? Never tried subbing semolina. May give that a try. While you’re at it, and if you like baking, try my Quick Crackers – the olive oil in them make them “buttery” – in a very good way. Come back again soon!

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