Chive Vinaigrette

April 23, 2012 § 3 Comments

Stones. That’s my usual response to what fills my first harvest in my community garden in early spring. I spend days clearing the surface of these leaden balloons. But not really. They’re always right below the soil, ready to buoy themselves up. Stones float. That’s the only possible reason for their constant surfacing.

This year, though, my garden has a new, less stony epidermis. Long story short, there’s 6 inches of new soil in my garden. Stones, still, but not as in springs past. Give it some time.

This spring’s first harvest is chives. Thrilling, I know. I had never planted them in my plot. They were just sorta there, leftovers from previous gardeners. But just before that 6 inches was layered down, I thought to rescue the just-emerging greeny spikes. And because I gave them a second chase at life, I decided to fulfill their purpose. I decided to use them in some way in my kitchen.

Right. And exactly how would I do this? What does one do with chives, anyway? I’m sure something, but nothing came to mind. Google rescued me, of course, sending me to several different sites. Oh yes, biscuits were made—cheddar-chive biscuits. And a chive chip is on my wait list. But for now, let’s start with something easy. Let’s get all vinaigrette.

Epicurious, thank you for this green-as-goodness dressing. Faced with a minimalistic salad (i.e., I really didn’t have much in the fridge and the salad, therefore, was a bit weak), this vinaigrette perked up what was paltry. You could say, I suppose, that the chives did indeed fulfill their purpose.

Chive Vinaigrette, ala Epicurious:

Chive vinaigrette


  • 1/3 cup chopped fresh chives
  • 1/4 cup Champagne vinegar
  • 1 small shallot, coarsely chopped
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 2/3 cup vegetable oil
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1. Blend the first five ingredients in a blender. Just a note here: I used white wine vinegar – didn’t have Champagne vinegar in the house. And show yourself some respect—use a good Dijon.

2. Next up, the oils. With motor running, slowing add in the veg oil and evoo. Hold off on the last quarter of that 1/3 cup evoo. Give it a taste first and see if more is needed.

3. You’re done. Well, not really. Before you’re done, give it a taste. It’ll benefit from a pinch of kosher salt. Or two.

The result: a more-beautiful-than-you-expected green green green dressing with a light but full-flavored expression. But I give you fair warning before you enjoy —you’ll want to be sure the person you kiss next has also partaken. Chives are onions, after all.

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§ 3 Responses to Chive Vinaigrette

  • Sarah says:

    Ahh yes, the garden stones. In New Hampshire they say the biggest crop is rocks. “Wawbeek” as my tribe (Abenaki) calls it. Clear a field one year and the next year’s crop rise up!
    Beautiful food photos I enjoy so much! Amsterdam, today’s gorgeous green vinaigrette, etc.

  • Karen says:

    Chives is the first thing that comes to life in my herb garden. Your vinaigrette is such a beautiful color and I’m sure tastes great.

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